Harnett Correctional Institution

Mailing and Street Address: Box 1569, 1210 E. McNeill Street, Lillington, NC 27546
Phone: 910-893-2751
County: Harnett
Offender capacity:
 988
Facility Type: Male, Medium Custody

LIMITED VISITATION RESUMES OCT. 1, 2020

The Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice will resume limited visitation at all state’s prisons effective Oct. 1, 2020 with significant restrictions due to the pandemic. Visitation was suspended in all state prisons on March 16, 2020, with the exception of legal and pastoral visits, to help prevent the potential spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

The health and safety of employees and offenders in our care are the top priorities of the Department of Public Safety. For information on coronavirus and how to protect yourself, please go the NC Department of Health and Human Services website.

To learn what else Prisons is doing to combat coronavirus, click here.

For more information on visitation, click here.

Directions

From Raleigh, take U.S. 401 south to Lillington. Once in town, stay on U.S. 401. At the third signal, take a left onto East McNeil Street. The unit is three-quarters of a mile down on the right.
 

Sending Mail to Offenders

All Prison facilities encourage family and friends to write to offenders. For security reasons, all incoming mail is checked to see if it contains any illegal or unauthorized items. Outgoing mail from offenders may also be checked. Personal letters will not be read unless the officer-in-charge or designee has reason to believe the letter contains threats of harm or criminal activity, escape plans, or plans to violate prison rules. If the officer-in-charge decides to delay or not deliver the letter to the offender, the offender will be told in writing the reason for this action.

Incoming mail from lawyers, any legal aid service assisting offenders, and state and federal court officials must be opened in the presence of the offender before it is checked for illegal or unauthorized items. 

Letters to an offender must include the offender’s prison ID number, which is often referred to as the OPUS number. The letter should be addressed in this format:

Offender Name and OPUS Number
Prison Name
Prison Street Address or Post Office Box number
City, State and zip code of the prison location

Example: John Smith #1234567
Maury Correctional Institution
P.O. Box 506
Maury, N.C. 28554

For information regarding sending money to offenders, ordering packages for offenders and the offender telephone system, please click here
 

Overview

Harnett Correctional Institution has grown from a one-dormitory prison built when the State Highway Department ran the state prisons to a 30-acre prison compound sitting on a 198-acre site for medium security adult males. It has seven housing units divided into 29 separate dormitories, including 34 single cells used for restrictive housing purposes. The prison also has a dining hall, recreation building, education building, two vocational buildings, a chapel, six modular buildings, and a medical building for dental and nursing staff.

Central Carolina Community College works with the prison to provide vocational programs such as Barbering, Carpentry, Electrical Wiring, Food Services, Masonry, Welding, and Facility Maintenance. Classes in adult education and for preparing to take the HI-SET tests are also available. Offenders may also seek four-year degrees through University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill correspondence courses.

Correction Enterprises moved its meat processing plant from Dunn to Harnett in 1994. Offenders help process millions of pounds of frozen foods and meats for use in state prisons.

In January 1991, the Prisons Mental Health Services began the Sex Offender Accountability and Responsibility Program at Harnett. The mental health program provides treatment for up to 46 offenders for each 20-week program cycle.  Harnett also offers a Substance Abuse Treatment Program.

Harnett was one of 51 county prisons the state assumed responsibility for with the passage of the Conner Bill in 1931. It was one of 61 field unit prisons renovated or built during the late 1930's to house inmates who worked building roads.