Pender Correctional Institution

Mailing Address: Box 1058, Burgaw, NC 28425
Street Address: 906 Penderlea Highway, Burgaw, NC 28425
Phone: (910) 259-8735 
County: Pender
Offender capacity: 768
Facility type: Male, Medium Custody
 

LIMITED VISITATION RESUMES OCT. 1, 2020

The Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice will resume limited visitation at all state’s prisons effective Oct. 1, 2020 with significant restrictions due to the pandemic. Visitation was suspended in all state prisons on March 16, 2020, with the exception of legal and pastoral visits, to help prevent the potential spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

The health and safety of employees and offenders in our care are the top priorities of the Department of Public Safety. For information on coronavirus and how to protect yourself, please go the NC Department of Health and Human Services website.

To learn what else Prisons is doing to combat coronavirus, click here.

For more information on visitation, click here.

Directions

From I-40, take exit 398 for Jacksonville/Burgaw and turn toward Burgaw on NC 53. After about 1.5 miles, you will pass through a stop light and then reach a stop sign about a half-mile beyond that. Turn right onto Timberly Lane and then left onto Wallace Street. Stay on Wallace Street for about a mile until you reach the stop sign at the intersection with Penderlea Highway. Turn right onto Penderlea Road and the unit will be on the right.

SENDING MAIL TO OFFENDERS

Until Oct. 18, letters to an offender must be addressed to the prison where they are currently assigned. Addresses must include the offender’s prison ID number, which is often referred to as the OPUS number.

The letter should be addressed in this format:

Offender Name and OPUS Number
Prison Name
Prison Street Address or Post Office Box number
City, State and zip code of the prison location

Example: 
John Smith #1234567
Avery-Mitchell Correctional Institution
600 Amity Park Road
Spruce Pine, NC 28777

Beginning Oct. 18, the N.C. Department of Public Safety has changed the way offenders receive mail. To help keep contraband out of prisons, all mail to offenders must be sent through a private company, TextBehind.

You must address mail to offenders in this way, or it will be returned:

Offender Name and OPUS Number
Prison Name
P.O. Box 247
Phoenix, MD 21131

Examples:

John Doe #1234567                      Jane Doe #7654321
Polk Correctional Institution          N.C. Correctional Institution for Women
P.O. Box 247                                P.O. Box 247
Phoenix, MD 21131                        Phoenix, MD 21131

The state’s prisons for women have been using TextBehind since February 2020.

Here’s how it works:

  • Offender mail is addressed and delivered to TextBehind.
  • TextBehind will make digital copies of the contents.
  • TextBehind will forward the digital files to the prison.
  • The prison will print acceptable pages and deliver them to the offender.

You may also download the TextBehind app to send mail by a smartphone or computer, avoiding paper mail sent via the U.S. Postal Service.

Offenders will continue to receive all acceptable contents of the mail you send — letters, photos, cards, artwork, etc. For more information about TextBehind, including a short video, click here.

Click here for Frequently Asked Questions.

TextBehind will not accept packages or legal mail. For more information on sending packages or legal mail, see the FAQs. You can also contact the prison where the offender is currently assigned.

All Prison facilities encourage family and friends to write to offenders. For security reasons, all incoming mail is checked to see if it contains any illegal or unauthorized items. Outgoing mail from offenders may also be checked.

Personal letters will not be read unless the officer-in-charge or designee has reason to believe the letter contains threats of harm or criminal activity, escape plans or plans to violate prison rules. If the officer-in-charge decides to delay or not deliver the letter to the offender, the offender will be told in writing the reason for this action.

Incoming mail from lawyers, any legal aid service assisting offenders, or state and federal court officials must be opened in the presence of the offender before it is checked for illegal or unauthorized items.

For information regarding sending money to offenders, ordering packages for offenders or about the offender telephone system, please click the links.

Overview

Pender Correctional Institution has six dormitories, education buildings, recreation building, medical building, dining hall, operations center, administration building, programs building, gatehouse and chapel.

Correction Enterprises converted the old dormitory and old recreation building on the original Pender Correctional Center to a sewing plant that manufactures uniforms for offenders, ferry workers and correctional officers. Many offenders are assigned to work on facility food service, facility maintenance, janitor services or assist staff.

Cape Fear Community College works with the prison to provide vocational classes in light construction and diesel mechanics. Classes for adult education and preparation for the GED are available.

Offenders who have development disabilities are assigned to the horticultural therapy program that trains them for landscaping and gardening jobs. Offenders may also be assigned to the Drug Alcohol Chemical Dependency Program (ACDP/Pender-AND90) unit. ACDP is a 12-week term of intensive treatment for alcohol and drug addiction in a residential facility at prisons. Other self-development, treatment and education programs are offered during evening hours and on weekends.

Pender Correctional Institution was one of the first prisons to have teleconferencing capability used for management meetings, staff training and inmate education.

Ground was broken on November 30, 1990 to build the 756-bed medium security prison for adult males, adjacent to the 112-bed medium security Pender Correctional Center. The old medium security prison was established as a one-dormitory unit in 1935 as one of 61 field unit prisons renovated or built during the late 1930's to house offenders who worked building roads.