Donate to Hurricane Recovery

Move Over Law

North Carolina's Move Over law protects State Troopers and other law enforcement officers and emergency and utility workers stopped along side our highways.

The Highway Patrol has taken steps to ensure more safety for citizens and troopers. In January, 2002, the state's Move Over law took effect requiring motorists, if they can safely do so, to move one lane away from any law enforcement or other emergency vehicle that is on the side of the highway.  This law includes utility vehicles that are on the side of the road restoring electrical service during an unplanned event such as a hurricane or ice storm.  The utility vehicles are required to have a flashing amber-colored light.

The law requires motorists slow down and approach cautiously when an emergency vehicle is stopped on the shoulder of the roadway with its lights flashing. Motorists are required to move over to another lane away from the emergency vehicle on a multi-lane highway or slow down on a two lane highway and can do so safely. Motorists must slow down while maintaining a safe speed. G.S. 20-157 (f).

A violation of the move over law will result in a mandatory fine of $250.00 plus court costs.

Incident Involving Trooper M. G. McLamb

August 11, 2005, Cumberland County

On  August 11, 2005, at approximately 1:00 P.M. Trooper M. G. McLamb was conducting a traffic enforcement stop on US 301 near the NC 59 Exit just south of Fayetteville in Cumberland County. 

Trooper McLamb was standing on the driver's side of the stopped vehicle and had just turned to return his patrol car when he was struck. A motorist failed to move over and decrease speed and struck Trooper McLamb. 

Trooper McLamb was treated and released. 

The Move Over law requires motorists to approach cautiously when an emergency vehicle is stopped on the shoulder of the roadway with its lights flashing. Motorists are required to change lanes away from the emergency vehicle on a multi-lane highway or slow down on a two lane highway and can do so safely. Motorists must slow down while maintaining a safe speed. G.S. 20-157 (f). 

 

Effective July 1, 2006, fines increased to $500 along with the possibility of being charged with a felony if a collision occurs that results in serious injury or death.

To view in car video click here.(link is external)

To view in car video in slow motion click here.(link is external)

Trooper McLamb